Recommendations On How To Compose An Introduction For A Term Paper


You need to know how to write an introduction in order to get a good grade on your term paper. This tells the reader what you’re going to talk about and rationalizing why it’s worth exploring in the first place. Because introductions aren’t confined to a word limit, you should use as much space as appropriate for your topic. Usually a paragraph or two is efficient.

Since an introduction is the first part anybody reads, it sets the tone and depth of the rest of the entire paper. It’s strongly suggested that you write it last because of this. You won’t really know what you want to introduce until you’ve written the body of the paper about it. Then you can go back and write more eloquently about the topic you’ve already explored.

How to write a great term paper introduction


Here are the jobs an introduction needs to do:

  • Catch the reader’s interest
  • Start talking about both sides of an issue
  • Includes the thesis statement or question
  • Poses a way to solve that question or explore the statement
  • Gives an overall view of the paper

So how can you accomplish all that in just a paragraph or two at the beginning of your homework? It’s not as hard as it might seem. You don’t have to have everything about your topic—in fact it’s best to keep the introduction short and sweet. When writing introductions, like any skill, you will get better as you write more of them. Each project will stretch your writing abilities differently. Here are some key things to mention in the introduction:

  • Talk about the reasons behind your research, what it’s based upon and how it’s different than any one source you’ve cited
  • Discuss your objectives for this research and hypothesis
  • Briefly mention any weaknesses in the sources at the start, so the reader can judge the validity of your arguments
  • Structure your introduction just like the broader essay, only on a much smaller scale—don’t go rambling off and keep it succinct
  • Logic dictates you should end the introduction where your pose your research question or statement, explaining what you want to do with this paper
  • If your essay turns out a little different than you outlined it to be, that’s okay—edit it to be more coherent or tweak the introduction to fit the rest of the essay